Is your terrier empathetic? Share a story that’s touched your heart.

We really need to come to our senses and embrace the emotional make-up of our dogs–especially terriers.  When we do, life with them just makes more sense. For everyone involved.

Bossy After The Storm

Many animals are ’empathic’.  Don’t believe me? Watch this amazing video presentation by Frans de Waal, acclaimed Dutch primatologist and ethologist, that aired originally on the TED network.  He provides evidence of empathy and compassion, reciprocity and fairness in the animal kingdom.  Turns out there’s proof empathy isn’t just for people. Now that’s an “idea worth spreading”, though good ‘dog people’ know it instinctively.

If you own any kind of terrier–a Cairn, a Border or a Pit Bull, for instance–you’ve seen empathy and plenty of it.  All dogs have it. But terriers seem to have more of it than most.  (See Terrier Logic # 12).

Terriers are emotional beings and can recognize, respond to and mirror our emotions.

When someone coughs or sneezes at my house, Bossy is right there checking on her person.  You OK?  Good. Now rub my belly.  When a golfer on TV rims a putt, both of my dogs console my husband after confirming he didn’t have a heart attack. More kisses.  And like most people, my dogs will snuggle in close when they know someone isn’t feeling well. I’m not leaving your side; I’ll stay here as long as you need me.

How does two-way empathy help us in handling our feisty terriers?  If we can change, our dogs can change.  And change usually starts in our hearts.

Is your terrier empathetic? Do you think terriers are more empathetic than other breeds you’ve lived with? Share your story about a terrier that’s touched your heart and shown you his.  Click on the comment bubble on the top right or write your story below.

Lyme Disease is more tenacious than a Master Earthdog

Many terrier owners are doing Earthdog Trials with their dogs this time of year.  You could be doing hunt-ups in long grasses, searching for hidden rats among the brush then WAITING as your dogs go to ground.  That’s on top of all the standing around you`ll be doing at the test site.

Somewhere along the way, a lyme-infected tick could hitch a ride–on you or your dog. So be on the lookout for ticks.   Recent reports say that 10% of black-legged ticks carry the bacteria (Borrelia burgdorferi) that`s responsible for Lyme Disease.

Lyme is officially on the rise in Canada, yet disease incidence numbers are probably grossly under-estimated.  While most dogs don’t get Lyme when they`re bitten by a tick, you`re much more like to become infected.  Be vigilant. Not all bites have a classic bullseye rash.

The Lyme Disease bacteria is formidable.  It’s tougher, smarter and way more tenacious than any Earthdog you`ll ever meet. Learn more and stay informed if you`re going to be out working with your Earthdog. Visit www.canlyme.com

Recent News on Lyme: http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/1215210–ticks-that-can-carry-lyme-disease-agent-spreading